• Feed hay to reduce waste by feeding in rings, strip feeding under temporary electric wire, or only unrolling enough for a day or less.
  • Strip graze any remaining stockpiled forage to extend grazing days.
  • Limited grazing of winter annuals will improve animal nutrition, extend hay supplies, and allow use of limited high quality forage.
  • Clover and lespedeza can be overseeded during February into short-grazed fescue pastures. Inoculate seed. Consider strip or stripe seeding in difficult areas. Make sure soil test is good enough for clover. Demo project is available for agents.
  • Implement a winter annual weed control program.
  • To promote earlier greenup and grazing of fescue and winter annuals, fertilize specific pastures in February for grazing in March. Other pastures can be fertilized in March for spring. But don't apply N fertilizer where clovers are overseeded or where good clover stands exist.
  • Start rotationally grazing at greenup. Don't let cows chase green grass over the entire farm since that will delay significant growth and sustained grazing even longer. 
  • Soil sampling of pastures.
    • If you were not able to test soil fertility in fall, do so now to avoid fertility shortfalls once temperatures rise and forage begin to grow at a faster rate. Soil samples can be obtained easily and testing them is free of charge.
  • Apply burn-down herbicide to dormant bermudagrass.
    • This is very important for keeping bermudagrass pastures clean of broadleaf weeds. Herbicide of choice is glyphosate.
    • Use rates according to the label; do not skimp with rates, the bermudagrass will not be affected if it is still dormant but weeds will be killed reliably.

Reapply herbicide if needed. Bermudagrass should not be mowed/grazed for 60 days after application, so time herbicide application accordingly.