American Royal champions bring record-breaking prices

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Sales of championship livestock at the American Royal annual Junior Premium Livestock Auction reached a total value of over $525,000, including record-breaking prices in four categories.

Supporters lined up to bid on championship animals on Oct. 27. A portion of the bids contribute to education and scholarships for youth participants to continue the tradition of "Supporting Youth and Education since 1899."

The 2013 auction set a new record for the Grand Champion Market Steer purchased by Neal and Jeanne Patterson with the Cerner Corporation for $170,000. The Reserve Grand Champion Steer brought $56,000 from the high bidder, the Kemper Foundation and UMB Financial Corporation.

According to an American Royal Association news release, the Grand Champion Market Hog brought $40,000 from a group including Dana Foote, David Fowler, Steve Frye, KPMG LLP, Brant Laue, Laue Ranch, Greg & Liz Maday, John & Kate Mitchell, Rick Norden, Cynthia P. Savage, Brad Sprong, Charlie & Tracy Tetrick, Chandler & Tim Thayer.

The Grand Champion Market Lamb auction was the fourth record-breaker, bringing in $60,000.

A total of 66 head of livestock were sold, including 24 steers, 25 hogs, 15 lambs, and 2 goats.

The exhibitors of the Grand and Reserve Champion Market Steers each contributed 10 percent of their respective sales to the Stanley E. Stout Scholarship Fund.



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anonymous    
October, 31, 2013 at 12:06 PM

Wonder how much of that 170k wound up in a steer jock's pocket? Kids livestock showing can be a wonderful experience for them and the family, if done right. But let's face it, the only thing the kid actually has to do is take the halter and show the steer for a few minutes. Literally everything else can, and in some cases is, done by some adult. Maybe the parent or maybe not. The benefit of showing, done right, occurs during the months before walking into the ring. The show is a competition. Some say the important thing is the kids, not the cattle. Then why do we place the cattle?

Robert    
Skiatook, OK  |  October, 31, 2013 at 05:59 PM

you hit it right on! We are not teaching kids responsibility, we are teaching them that money wins! At the big shows I have attended, the potential winners all have four "steer jocks" fitting them while the junior exhibitor stands there, maybe scratching the animal's belly with a show stick. That teaches them a lot. Let's have shows where no one but the exhibitor is allowed to touch the animal from the time they arrive until they show. Maybe then some hard working kid who actually takes care of their animal and learns to fit them will win.


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