DENVER, Colo. - Two recently published studies found significant health benefits from diets containing a fatty acid called Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA), found naturally in ruminant products, such as beef and milk.

The first study, "Induction of Apoptosis by Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Cultured Mammary Tumor Cells and Premalignant Lesions of the Rat Mammary Gland" by Clement Ip, Ph.D., was published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention in July 2000. It shows that feeding CLA during the
early stage of breast cancer development is able to reduce the number of precancerous lesions in mammary tissue.

The second study, "Influence of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) on Establishment and Progression of Atherosclerosis in Rabbits" by David Kritchevsky, Ph.D., confirmed earlier observations that CLA can inhibit atherogenesis in rabbits. It was published in the Journal of the American
College of Nutrition in August 2000.

Both research efforts were supported by cattle producers through their $1-per-head beef checkoff.

The study reported in Ip's paper shows that CLA feeding during the early stage of breast cancer development can reduce the number of precancerous lesions in mammary tissue. Human epidemiological studies by other researchers have shown that breast cancer incidence tends to be lower in
subjects with higher levels of CLA in their tissues. Because of these findings, a real and beneficial link appears to exist between CLA and reduced incidence of breast cancer.

National Cattlemen's Beef Association