Preparing the beef calf for weaning

One fact on which cattlemen, veterinarians, and animal scientists can agree is that of all the events in most calves’ lives, weaning is the most stressful of them all. If a calf can weather this stress unscathed, they have cleared a major hurdle to a productive future in the feedlot or as a replacement in the breeding herd. FULL STORY »

NMSU developing food supp. to improve cattle digestive system

During drought, having cattle that can tolerate poor nutritional forage is the difference between a cow and calf operation going under, or staying in business. Pregnant cows have a harder time during drought because they are eating for two. FULL STORY »

Cattle health during the dog days of summer: Treating responsibly

“For both pinkeye and footrot cases, you’re going to want to have cattle in a place where you can check them 2 to 3 days later so if you need to treat them again, you can,” says John Maas, former veterinarian with the University of California at Davis Cooperative Extension, and chairman of the Beef Quality Assurance Advisory Board. FULL STORY »

Footrot can be more problematic in wet years

Footrot is generally caused by common bacteria found in the soil. The resulting lameness will reduce mobility, weight gain and reproductive reproductive performance. FULL STORY »

Cattle health during the dog days of summer: Fly control

Frustrating and at times hard to kill, fly control offers many benefits to cattle producers. The buzzing pests are the carriers of bacteria and disease, such as anaplasmosis – a cow killing, weight dropping, aborting and bull infertility nightmare. FULL STORY »

Cattle health during the dog days of summer: Pinkeye

Pinkeye in cattle is most commonly caused by the Moraxella bovis (M. bovis) bacteria, but there are other species like M. bovis’ younger sister, Moraxella bovoculi, that can come into play – and they’re not all covered by the same treatments. FULL STORY »

Cattle health during the dog days of summer: Footrot

Summertime: Bulls are turned out with spring calving females on pasture for breeding, stocker cattle enjoy their last stop on grass before transitioning into the feedyard, and bred fall cows spend their days grazing without a care in the world – it’s almost like paradise. FULL STORY »

Jump starting those late calving cows

Breeding season will be soon underway for the mid April and May calving cow herds. However, we all have some late calving cows that are less than 40 to 60 days postpartum. The question is how can we “jump start” some of those late calving cows to start cycling and move them up in the calving season? FULL STORY »

Pinkeye reduction in your dairy/beef herd

Pinkeye, also known as infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) is a highly contagious disease, causing inflammation of the cornea (the clear outer layer) and conjunctiva (the pink membrane lining the eyelids) of the eye. FULL STORY »

Fly control/pinkeye prevention needs to be continuous

With the grazing season well underway, most cattlemen have strategically planned their fly control program, focused primarily on pinkeye prevention. Obviously, cow/calf comfort and increased production are always considerations of fly-control programs but anyone who has witnessed the results of a pinkeye outbreak knows the discomfort and lost performance that occur. FULL STORY »

Summer pneumonia in the beef herd

Over the past several years, respiratory disease in pre-weaned calves on pasture has been increasingly identified in beef herds. These outbreaks tend to be unpredictable, occurring in well-managed herds as well as in not-so-well-managed herds. As such, they are frustrating for cattle producers and veterinarians alike. FULL STORY »

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