Managing phosphorus in pastures

Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for plants, but too much can mean trouble for waterways. Phosphorus is critical to plant health and growth by helping the development of root and increasing resistance to disease. FULL STORY »

Consider oats and turnips for fall grazing

Consider planting oats and turnips in early maturing corn silage fields for fall/winter grazing. Be sure to make a commitment to plant as early as possible. FULL STORY »

Sweet clover abundance: Good or bad?

Have you noticed an abundance of yellow sweet clover this summer? This can be good or bad, depending on how it may affect your pastures, your hay, and your cattle. FULL STORY »

GrassSnap- A mobile app for monitoring grasslands

GrassSnap makes photo-monitoring a snap! Rangeland managers can quickly grab repeatable photo-monitoring data, and save it to their smart device. Data can easily be downloaded to a computer. FULL STORY »

Predicted El Niño improves winter pasture prospects this fall

El Niño refers to warmer-than-average ocean water temperatures off the Pacific coast of South America, which usually means more moisture to parts of the Southwest and Southeast U.S. during the late fall and winter, according to climatologists. FULL STORY »

Tips for hay-baling safety, efficiency

As growers statewide finish their first cutting of hay crops, now is a good time to do preventative maintenance tasks that can boost farm profits and protect farm workers, says a safety research associate and lecturer from Ohio State University's College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences. FULL STORY »

Native warm-season grasses to offset the ‘summer slump’

Native warm-season grasses, such as switchgrass, eastern gamagrass, little or big bluestem, and indiangrass can be the answer to fill production gaps caused by summer dormancy of cool-season grasses. FULL STORY »

Second-cutting fescue makes quality hay when...

Farmers cutting fescue hay don’t get many second chances to make quality hay. This is a one-in-five year, says Craig Roberts, University of Missouri Extension forage specialist. Cool spring temperatures made for bad fescue hay. FULL STORY »

Grazing Bites: June 2014

It is probably not possible to have perfect weather here in Indiana. Like most have heard, "if you don't like Indiana weather, wait five minutes and it will change." The weather that is good for one person or situation is most likely not good for another. FULL STORY »

When should you cut prairie hay?

Prairie hay is mostly warm-season grasses like the bluestems and gramas, indiangrass, switchgrass, lovegrass, or prairie sandreed. There might be some wheatgrass or junegrass or other cool-season species present. FULL STORY »

Adding forage options with summer annuals

Warm-season annuals are excellent options to consider as a way to increase a farm or ranch’s forage production. These are a group of annual grasses that perform best during the warmest part of the summer and are typically planted in June or July. FULL STORY »

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