Monitoring pastures assists sustainable management

"It's hard to know where you are going if you don't know where you've been." This old saying has many applications and is easily applied to pasture and range management. One area of management in which it can be applied is with prescribed grazing. FULL STORY »

Picking a summer annual forage

Summer annual grasses are important forage crops in the Southeast. They have a significant fit in our forage systems to fill in the summer forage gap in the Fescue Belt and as an emergency forage crop for dry summers or bare ground. FULL STORY »

Using early weaning to survive the drying and trying times

Hot air swells across the land, sucking what little moisture is left out of the ground. It’s been days since a decent rain and much of the area is wilting away in a parched state. Amidst it all stands a rancher, looking out across the once flourishing paradise which will turn into a desiccate wasteland if rains don’t come. FULL STORY »

Plant warm season annuals to boost pastures’ productivity

One way to help struggling pastures recover and increase the amount of available forage is with warm season annuals, said David Fernandez, Cooperative Extension Program livestock specialist at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. FULL STORY »

Grass, protein and climate: New information leads to new question

We use a number of tools to get at how grass will be affected, but one of the best ways to understand grass is to look at what eats it. Or what is left after something has eaten it. FULL STORY »

Cost-effective diets for pregnant beef cows Play video

Dry conditions in Kansas and other areas of the Midwest have caused many cow/calf producers to look at more cost-effective ways to adequately feed their herd. FULL STORY »

Cool weather slows pasture grasses

Cool weather this spring slowed growth of cool-season grasses, the main forage in Missouri pastures. Lack of sunshine and warmth delayed grass leaves, the feed of grazing livestock. By mid-May, the shortened grass begins to set seed heads. FULL STORY »

Certify hay as weed free

Are you interested in another market for your hay this year? Maybe you should have it certified as “weed free” FULL STORY »

Hay storage matters

Your round bales are up and it’s time to move hay off the field into storage. If not stored properly, producers can suffer massive losses in nutritional content of forage. FULL STORY »

Harvesting sunlight

Input costs keep rising. Seed, fertilizer, pesticides, fuel, hay, supplements, trucking – everything seems to get more expensive. But miraculously, the most important input is still free. The input I’m talking about is sunlight. FULL STORY »

Weed Watch: Treat early, if possible

Chemical control of weeds is not always possible, McGowin says, depending on conditions. While some parts of his Southeast region experienced drought within the past few years, more recently excessive moisture has created weed challenges. FULL STORY »

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