Grazing Practices

Forage Focus: Stretching out the spring flush of forage growth

For most of us, forage growth has finally started and we are getting the spring "flush" of growth. For pasture and hay fields that are primarily grass based, we may get up to 70% of our growth in the next month or so. FULL STORY »

Early action helps avoid losing forage to grasshopper damage

Prolonged drought brings dry conditions and the potential for a surge of grasshopper populations that can hurt pastures, rangeland and hay production. FULL STORY »

Lease agreements to specify stocking rate, a drought clause

The two most important components of a grazing lease agreement are stocking rate and lease rate, according to Jay Jenkins, UNL Extension Educator in Cherry County. FULL STORY »

Cattle feeding: Grazing damaged wheat Play video

Daren Redfearn has advice on using freeze-damaged wheat as forage. FULL STORY »

Extension expert: Grass not yet ready for grazing

While the calendar may say it is officially spring, the weather outside in many areas may not necessarily agree. As a result, producers may want to hold off grazing for a week or so longer than in a typical year, which could help pastures build up the roots to allow for a more productive grazing season. FULL STORY »

Native warm-season grasses: Drought proof or drought tolerant?

An article in a recent agriculture magazine had a quote claiming that native warm-season grass pastures are drought proof, and producers are excited at that possibility. FULL STORY »

Cool weather slows Oklahoma forage development

Drought conditions across Oklahoma are significantly improved compared to three months ago. FULL STORY »

Grazing season extension for the beef cow-calf producer

Tight forage supplies and lack of available grazing land make the goal of grazing season extension even more important. FULL STORY »

Forage Focus: Pasture and hayfield renovation

As a result of last summer's drought, I am getting questions about pasture and hayfield renovation. What can be done to thicken up forage stands that have been thinned out? FULL STORY »

First green grass of spring not enough to supply nutrient needs

Turning cow herds out to graze pastures at the first sign of green grass harms forage growth later in the season. But there’s another big reason to wait, says a University of Missouri beef nutritionist. FULL STORY »

Mineral supplements reduce risk of grass tetany

For much of Oklahoma, wheat pasture is shorter than normal, but lack of hay, standing forage, and high priced supplements have forced some cow herds onto the graze-out wheat this spring. FULL STORY »

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