The United States is no longer a nation of laws, but a nation of rules, Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina said.

The Environmental Protection Agency is a classic example, the former chief executive officer of Hewlett-Packard said.

“The last time I was in a soybean field, I was on a combine. I was fascinated by the technology of modern-day ag equipment,” Fiorina said. “The farmer was looking at some blue lines on a computer screen. I asked what he was looking at, and he told me waterways. I asked if he would take me to see a waterway. The EPA controls this.”

The first woman to lead a Top 20 Fortune 500 company called for a top-to-bottom review of all regulations in place.

“All these groups are rolling out rules. No one is overseeing. No one is looking at the cost vs. benefits,” Fiorina said. “These rules are crushing farmers. Crushing small businesses. These need to be rolled back.”

During the latest installment of RFD-TV’s Rural Town Hall series, Fiorina outlined her vision for rural America while answering questions from agribusiness leaders concerning education, Social Security, health care, fair trade and food and farming regulations.

“Policies are about who is best able to make a decision or an investment,” Fiorina said during the forum. “A bureaucrat doesn’t understand how best to implement. We have an out-of-control government bureaucracy. Our people have gone along with this for 50 years. People have been tinkering around the edges of these problems for years, but not ever getting anything done. Rural America has a hugely vital role in the world.”

Produced in conjunction with Mediacom Connections Channel, the Rural Town Hall series also has featured presidential candidates Lindsey Graham, Ted Cruz, Rick Santorum, Bobby Jindal and Dr. Ben Carson.

Encore airings can be found on RFD-TV and RURAL RADIO SiriusXM Channel 147, or can be seen online at the RFD-TV Country Club at www.rfdcc.com.

Fiorina would like to see the role of women furthered in agriculture, she said.

“We know that in the developing world, if you get more women engaged in agriculture, production goes up,” Fiorina said. “In education, literacy goes up. When I was with Opportunity International, we would provide small loans to women. The problem is that this administration’s policy has made it hard to get access to credit.”

Community banks are the backbone for farmer loans, she said.

“The federal government has made access to capital harder. That is the impact. We have to take a different direction now.”

Fiorina also took aim at Social Security reform.

“Number one, there are lots of great ideas to reform social security. I’m going to start by assuring America that we can spend money wisely,” she said. “The federal budget is being mismanaged. There is fraud in Social Security. The federal government should prove they are doing their job well. That’s the difference between leadership and management. Leaders challenge the status quo. We need to solve these festering problems and create a government that the American people can be proud of.”