According to the latest Crop Progress report from the USDA, 69 percent of the country's corn is in good or excellent condition, unchanged from last week.  The average in very poor to poor condition was reported at 9 percent, up 3 percent from last week.

Overall, the areas to watch are Indiana and Ohio, both hurting with worsening conditions.

Corn: Focus on the eastern Corn Belt

Indiana has 25 percent of corn in very poor to poor condition. It is up 4 percent from last week's report, thanks to the more wet, unfavorable weather conditions.

"There was a momentary break in rainy weather only for it to return with a fierce vengeance," the Great Lakes Regional NASS Office in Indiana reported. "Fields that had begun to dry due to the improved weather quickly suffered a relapse of ponding and over saturation. Ponded areas coupled with cooler conditions have expanded the plant mortality area."

Ohio hasn't fared much better. The latest report puts them at 22 percent of corn in very poor to poor condition. That is a 7 percent increase from last week.

"Continued rains last week halted fieldwork, and farmers are getting more anxious about the state of their crops. Some field crops have ponded areas as well as extensive yellowing," the regional NASS office reported.

North Carolina is also struggling with conditions, going up 3 percent to an overall 21 percent in very poor to poor condition.

The USDA also reported 27 percent of the U.S. has corn silking.

Soybeans

Nearly two-thirds of soybeans - 62 percent - was rated in good to excellent condition. The average of soybeans in very poor to poor condition is 11 percent, up 2 percent from last week.

Soybean conditions in Indiana are at 26 percent in very poor to poor condition, which is up 5 percent from last week.

"Delays in winter wheat harvest has put a damper on planting doublecropped soybeans," the Great Lakes Regional NASS Office in Indiana reported. "Brown stem rot was present in several late planted soybean fields. Many farmers were unable to apply nitrogen and much needed fungicide on corn and soybeans, keeping both crops under 50 percent good to excellent condition. Similarly, reduced herbicide applications and increased rainfall has made weed control near impossible."

Ohio is at 22 percent in very poor to poor condition, which is 4 percent more than last week. Missouri is also not in good shape going up 2 percent from last week to 20 percent.

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